Trifold Brochure with Die Cut

 

Inspiration for this brochure came from the 100-year anniversary of the De Stijl movement. I chose to complete the assignment as an informational pamphlet for those interested in attending retrospective at the Gemeente Museum.

According to The Netherlands Museum Association, museum attendance is comprised of 80.00% working age population and in 2015 and 61.5% of those who visited museums were of an upper socioeconomic group (Recreational and cultural activities by income bracket, 2008). According to the Centraal Bureau highly educated people are more likely to attend cultural and museum events (Centraal Bureau). One in three people visited a museum in the Netherlands in 2003 and it was more frequent for those living in the city to attend a museum exhibition than those in rural areas(Centraal Bureau).

Most importantly, the Centraal Bureau states that: “They also receive a large share of the available subsidies and the growing number of foreign tourist” (Centraal Bureau). As such, I chose to complete the assignment to resonate with the educated, upper-middle class and foreign tourists. It is important to note that the EU Language Report in 2012, states that: “nine in 10 Dutch people speak English as a second language” (EU language report).

I chose a 3 by 8’’ grid and divided the brochure into three sections. The layout was heavily influenced by Mondrian’s Composition in Red, Blue and Yellow (1930). The painting is famous and would be recognized by most people. The brochure is in English catering to most tourists and 90% of the Dutch. It has a clean, modern design with a hint of character primarily from the use of Braggadocio as the header font. The pamphlet contains many folds, only revealing partial information to play out the curiosity of the observer. The die cut is situated as a means to perpetuate the idea of revealing and concealing information.

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